Dragon Ball SeriesMovie List

List Of All Dragon Ball Movies

(Last Updated On: September 27, 2020)

About Dragon Ball

Dragon Ball (Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru) is a Japanese media franchise created by Akira Toriyama in 1984. The initial manga, written and illustrated by Toriyama, was serialized in 1984’s Weekly Shōnen Jump. to 1995, with 519 individual chapters. compiled into 42 tankōbon volumes by its publisher Shueisha. Dragon Ball was initially inspired by the 16th century Chinese classic novel Journey to the West, as well as Hong Kong martial arts films. The series follows the adventures of the protagonist, Son Goku, from his childhood to adulthood as he trains in martial arts. He spends his childhood away from civilization until he meets a teenage girl named Bulma, who encourages him to join her quest to explore the world in search of the seven orbs known as Dragon Balls, which summon a dragon that grants wishes when reunited. . Throughout his journey, Goku makes several other friends, becomes a family man, discovers his alien heritage, and battles a wide variety of villains, many of whom are also searching for the Dragon Balls.

About Dragon Ball Movies

20 animated theatrical films based on the Dragon Ball series have been released in Japan. The three most recent films, Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods (2013), Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection ‘F’ (2015) and Dragon Ball Super: Broly (2018), were produced as feature films and received support. – solo theater releases in Japan (as well as limited theater releases in the US). They are also the first films to have original creator Akira Toriyama deeply involved in their production; Battle of Gods and Resurrection ‘F’ were remade in the first and second arcs of the Dragon Ball Super anime, which told the same stories as the two films in greater detail. The 1996 feature film, Dragon Ball: The Path to Power, was also a full-length theatrical release lasting 80 minutes and was produced to coincide with the anime’s 10th anniversary as a reimagining of the anime. first. series bows.

All of the previous films were mostly below the length of feature films (around 45 to 60 minutes each), making them only slightly longer than an episode or two of the television series; This is because they were originally shown as back-to-back performances alongside other Toei film productions. These movies are also mostly alternate reruns of certain story arcs (like The Path to Power), or additional side stories that don’t correlate with the continuity of the series. The first three films, along with The Path to Power, are based on the original Dragon Ball anime series. The remaining thirteen oldest films are based on Dragon Ball Z. The first five films were screened at the Toei Manga Festival (東 映 ま ん が ま つ り, Tōei Manga Matsuri), while the sixth to seventeen films were screened at the Toei Anime Fair (東 映 ア ニ メ フ ェ ア, Toei Anime Fea).

Dragon Ball Movies List

List Of All Dragon BAll Movies (1)

1. Dragon Ball: Curse of the Blood Rubies

Dragon Ball: Curse of the Blood Rubies, known in Japan as Dragon Ball during its initial theatrical release and later renamed Dragon Ball: Shenron no Densetsu (ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル 神龍 の 伝 説, Doragon Bōru Shenron no Densetsu, lit. Dragon Ball: The Legend of Shenlong) for release on home video, is a 1986 Japanese anime fantasy martial arts adventure film and the first alternate continuity in a feature film series in the Dragon Ball anime franchise, based on Akira Toriyama’s manga of the same name. The film is a modified adaptation of the initial story arc in the manga, with the original character King Gurumes replacing the role of Emperor Pilaf as the main antagonist. As in the manga, it shows how Goku meets Bulma, as well as Oolong, Yamcha, Puar, and finally Master Roshi during his first search for the Dragon Balls.

Curse of the Blood Rubies was originally released in Japan on December 20, 1986, at the “Toei Manga Matsuri (都 営 漫画 亜 茉莉)” film festival, where it was shown as part of a triple film along with Gegege no Kitarō Gekitotsu! ! Ijigen Yōkai no Dai Hanran and Kinnikuman – Seigi Choujin vs. Senshi Choujin.

2. Dragon Ball: Sleeping Princess in Devil’s Castle

Dragon Ball: Sleeping Princess in Devil’s Castle (ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル 魔神 城 の ね む り 姫, Doragon Bōru Majin-jō no nemuri hime) is a 1987 Japanese anime fantasy martial arts adventure film and the second anime film based on Akira Toriyama’s Dragon Ball manga. It was originally released in Japan on July 18 at the “Toei Manga Matsuri” film festival as part of a quadruple feature film along with the first Saint Seiya film and the film versions of Hikari Sentai Maskman and Choujinki Metalder. An English dub of Funimation Productions was released on VHS in 1998.

3. Dragon Ball: Mystical Adventure

Dragon Ball: Mystical Adventure (ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル 魔 訶 不 思議 大 冒 険, Doragon Bōru: Makafushigi Dai-Bōken, literally “Dragon Ball: Great Mystical Adventure”), is a fantasy martial arts adventure movie 1988 Japanese and the third alternative Dragon Ball feature film continuity, originally released in Japan on July 9 at the “Toei Manga Matsuri” film festival as part of a quadruple feature film along with Bikkuriman 2: The Secret of Muen Zone, Tatakae! ! Ramenman and Kamen Rider Black: Terrifying! The Pass of the Devil’s Ghost House.

Unlike the previous two Dragon Ball movies, Mystical Adventure does not feature any original characters but instead adapts characters from Red Ribbon and 22nd Tenkaichi Budokai arcs from the manga’s story into the original story of the film.

4. Dragon Ball Z: Dead Zone

Dragon Ball Z: Dead Zone, originally released in theaters in Japan simply as Dragon Ball Z and later as Dragon Ball Z: Return My Gohan !! (Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル Z オ ラ の 悟 飯 を か え せ ッ !!, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru Zetto Ora no Gohan or Kaese !!) for its Japanese release on VHS and Laserdisc, is a Japanese movie fantasy martial arts series from 1989, the fourth installment in the Dragon Ball film series, and the first under the moniker Dragon Ball Z. It originally premiered in Japan on July 15 at the “Toei Manga Matsuri” film festival alongside featuring the 1989 film version of Himitsu no Akko-chan, Akuma-kun’s first film, and the film version of Kidou Keiji Jiban.

Despite some inconsistencies in continuity, Dead Zone acts as a prelude to the series and is the only film to have a full follow-up during Dragon Ball Z, featuring the Garlic Jr. arc.

5. Dragon Ball Z: The World’s Strongest

Dragon Ball Z: The World’s Strongest (Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル Z こ の 世 で 一番 強 い ヤ ツ, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru Zetto: Kono Yo de Ichiban Tsuyoi Yatsu), also known by the English title by Toei The Strongest Guy in the World, is a 1990 Japanese animated science fiction martial arts film and the second feature film in the Dragon Ball Z franchise. It originally released in Japan on March 10 between episodes 39 and 40 of DBZ, at the “Toei Manga Matsuri” film festival along with Akuma-kun’s second film (Welcome To Devil Land) and the 1990 film version of Sally the Witch.

6. Dragon Ball Z: The Tree of Might

Dragon Ball Z: The Tree of Might, also known by its Japanese title Dragon Ball Z: The Decisive Battle for the Entire Earth (Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル Z 地球 ま る ご と 超 決 戦, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru Zetto: Chikyū Marugoto Chōkessen) or Toei’s own English title Super Battle in the World, is a 1990 Japanese anime scientific fantasy martial arts film and the third Dragon Ball Z film. It was originally released in Japan on 7 July between episodes 54 and 55 of DBZ, at the “Toei Anime Fair” film festival, where it was shown as part of a triple feature film with the theme of Akira Toriyama entitled Toriyama Akira: The World (the other two films were versions anime of their unique stories Kennosuke-sama and Pink).

7. Dragon Ball Z: Lord Slug

Dragon Ball Z: Lord Slug, also known by its Japanese title Dragon Ball Z: Son Goku the Super Saiyan (Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル Z 超 ス ー パ ー サ イ ヤ 人 だ 孫悟空, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru Zetto Sūpā Saiyajin da Son Gokū in Japanese from 1991) animated science fiction martial arts film and the fourth Dragon Ball Z film. It was originally released in Japan on March 9 between episodes 81 and 82 at the Toei Anime Fair as part of a double feature with the first movie Magical Tarurūto-kun.

8. Dragon Ball Z: Cooler’s Revenge

Dragon Ball Z: Cooler’s Revenge, also known by its Japanese title Dragon Ball Z: The Incredible Mightiest vs. Mightiest (Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル Z と び き り の 最強 対 最強, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru Zetto: Tobikkiri no Saikyō tai Saikyō tai by Toei’s own English title Dragon Ball Z: The Strongest Rivals, is a 1991 Japanese anime science fiction martial arts film and the fifth Dragon Ball Z animated film, originally released in Japan on July 20 at the Toei Anime Fair.

9. Dragon Ball Z: The Return of Cooler

Dragon Ball Z: The Return of Cooler, known in Japan as Dragon Ball Z: Clash !! The Power of the 10 Billion Warriors (Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル Z 激 突 !! 100 億 パ ワ ー の 戦 士 た ち, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru Zetto Gekitotsu !! Hyaku-Oku Pawā no Senshi -tachi) or by the English title of Toei: Fight! 10 Billion Power Warriors, is a 1992 Japanese anime science fiction martial arts film, the sixth Dragon Ball Z film, originally released in Japan on March 7 at the Toei Anime Fair along with the second Dragon Quest: Dai no Daibōken and the third Magical Tarurūto -kun movie.

10. Dragon Ball Z: Super Android 13!

Dragon Ball Z: Super Android 13, known in Japan as Extreme Battle! The Three Great Super Saiyans (in Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル Z 極限 バ ト ル !! 三大 超 サ イ ヤ 人, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru Zetto Kyokugen Batoru !! San Dai Sūpā Saiyajin), is a film by 1992 Japanese anime sci-fi martial arts and the seventh Dragon Ball Movie Z martial arts film originally opened in Japan on July 11 at the Toei Anime Fair along with the third film Dragon Quest: Dai no Daibōken and the Rokudenashi Blues movie. The early concept art for the reissue used the title Android Assault, but the final product reverted to using the original Funimation title for the film.

11. Dragon Ball Z: Broly – The Legendary Super Saiyan

Dragon Ball Z: Broly – The legendary Super Saiyan, known in Japan as Dragon Ball Z: Burn Up! A Close Fight – A Violent Fight – A Super Fierce Fight (Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル Z 燃 え つ き ろ !! 熱 戦 ・ 烈 戦 ・ 超 激 戦, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru Zetto Moetsukiro !! Nessen Ressen Chō-Geki’sisen English) Z: The Burning Battles, is a 1993 Japanese anime science fiction martial arts film and the eighth Dragon Ball Z film. The original release date in Japan was March 6, 1993. at the Toei Anime Fair with Dr. Slump and Arale-chan: N-cha! Clear skies over Penguin Village. It was dubbed into English by Funimation in 2004.

The antagonist Broly was created by Takao Koyama and designed by series creator Akira Toriyama. This film is the first of five films starring the character, followed by Broly – Second Coming and Bio-Broly in 1994, Dragon Ball Z: The Real 4-D in Super Tenkaichi Budokai in 2017 and Dragon Ball Super: Broly in 2018, the first movie to carry the Dragon Ball Super brand.

12. Dragon Ball Z: Bojack Unbound

Dragon Ball Z: Bojack Unbound, known in Japan as Dragon Ball Z: The Galaxy’s at the Brink !! The Super Incredible Guy (Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル Z 銀河 ギ リ ギ リ !! ぶ っ ち ぎ り の 凄 い 奴, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru Zetto: Ginga Giri-Giri !! Butchigiri no Sugoi Yatsu) , is a ninth Japanese fantasy martial arts film from 1993. Dragon Ball Z movie. It was released in Japan on July 10 at the Toei Anime Fair, where it was shown alongside Dr. Slump and Arale-chan: ¡N -cha! From Penguin Village with Love and Yu Yu Hakusho’s first film. The antagonist Bojack was created by Takao Koyama and designed by series creator Akira Toriyama. The film is the latest to feature Kōhei Miyauchi as Master Roshi, who died two years after its release.

13. Dragon Ball Z: Broly – Second Coming

Dragon Ball Z: Broly – Second Coming, known in Japan as The Dangerous Duo. Super Warriors Never Rest (Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル Z 危 険 な ふ た り! 超 戦 士 は ね む れ な い, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru Zetto Kiken na Futari! Sūpā Senshi wa Nemurenai, is a Dangerous Dragon Ball Z from 1994 in Japanese). sci-fi martial arts anime film and the 10th Dragon Ball Z film. It was released in Japan on March 12 at the Toei Anime Fair alongside Dr. Slump and Arale-chan: Hoyoyo !! Follow the rescued shark … and the first Slam Dunk movie. It is the sequel to Dragon Ball Z: Broly – The Legendary Super Saiyan. The second sequel is Dragon Ball Z: Bio-Broly.

14. Dragon Ball Z: Bio-Broly

Dragon Ball Z: Bio-Broly, known in Japan as Dragon Ball Z Super Warrior Defeat !! I’ll Be The Winner (Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル Z 超 戦 士 撃 破 !! 勝 つ の は オ レ だ, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru Zetto Sūpā Senshi Gekiha !! Katsu No wa Ore da) or by Toei’s own English title Dragon Ball Z: Attack! Super Warriors, is a 1994 Japanese animated science fiction martial arts film and the eleventh Dragon Ball Z film. It was released in Japan on July 9 at the Toei Anime Fair alongside Dr. Slump and Arale-chan: N-cha !! Excited heart of summer vacation and the second Slam Dunk movie. It was the third Dragon Ball Z movie to feature the character of Broly, albeit as a genetic clone.

15. Dragon Ball Z: Fusion Reborn

Dragon Ball Z: Fusion Reborn, known in Japan as Dragon Ball Z Fukkatsu no Fusion !! Goku to Vegeta ((ラ ゴ ン ボ ボ ル Z 復活 の フ ュ ー ジ ョ ン !! 悟空 と ベ ジ ジ タ, “The Rebirth of Fusion !! Goku and Vegeta”), is an animated Japanese martial arts film 1995 fantasy film and the twelfth film in the Dragon Ball Z series. It was originally released in Japan on March 4 at Toei Anime Fair and was dubbed into English by Funimation in 2006.

16. Dragon Ball Z: Wrath of the Dragon

Dragon Ball Z: Wrath of the Dragon, known in Japan as Dragon Ball Z: Dragon Fist Explosion !! If Goku can’t do it, who will? (ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル Z 龍拳 爆 発 !! 悟空 が や ら ね ば 誰 が や る, Dragon Ball Z Ryū-Ken Bakuhatsu !! Gokū ga Yaraneba Dare ga Yaru) or by the English title of Toei Dragon Ball Z: Explosion of Dragon Punch, is a 1995 Japanese animated scientific fantasy martial arts film and the thirteenth Dragon Ball Z film. It was originally released in Japan on July 15 at the Toei Anime Fair. It was later dubbed into English by Funimation in 2006, just like most of the other Dragon Ball movies. It was also released on VCD in Malaysia by Speedy Video with the subtitle Explosion of Dragon Punch.

Set after the events of the final battle with Kid Buu, the film focuses on the efforts of an evil wizard, Hoi, to free the deadly monster Hirudegarn on Earth, forcing Goku and his friends to request the help of a warrior named Tapion. who may be the only one capable of defeating the monster. Series creator Akira Toriyama designed the characters for Tapion and Minotia.

17. Dragon Ball: The Path to Power

Dragon Ball: The Path to Power (Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル 最強 へ の 道, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru Saikyō e no Michi), is a 1996 Japanese animated fantasy martial arts adventure film and the seventeenth Animated feature film based on the Dragon Ball manga by Akira Toriyama. following the first three Dragon Ball movies and thirteen Dragon Ball Z movies. It is a retelling of the original Dragon Ball anime series, mixing elements from the first Dragon Ball quest and the subsequent Red Ribbon storyline. It was originally released in Japan on March 2 at the Toei Anime Fair, along with the film version of Neighborhood Story. The film was produced to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the original Dragon Ball anime. It was also the last theatrical Dragon Ball movie produced until the release of Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods in 2013.

18. Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods

Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods (Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル Z 神 と 神, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru Zetto: Kami to Kami, lit. “Dragon Ball Z: God and God”) is a Japanese film of 2013 animated scientific fantasy martial arts, the 18th feature film based on the Dragon Ball series, and the 14th to carry the Dragon Ball Z brand, released in theaters on March 30. It was the first Dragon Ball movie in 17 years to have a theatrical release, the last being the 10th anniversary movie in 1996, which followed the first three Dragon Ball movies and the thirteen Dragon Ball Z movies. Of the previous theatrical releases of Dragon Ball, this was a full-length production with a separate release and is not shown as part of the now-discontinued Toei Anime Fair (formerly Toei Manga Matsuri).

It was the first Japanese film to be screened in IMAX digital theaters and was released on Blu-ray and DVD on September 13, 2013. Funimation acquired the North American rights to Battle of Gods and produced an English dub which they co-released. with 20th Century Fox in North American theaters in August 2014. Madman Entertainment acquired the rights to Australasia and screened the film at the 2013 Japanese Film Festival in Australia before screening the English dub for select theaters in August 2014. Manga Entertainment released the film in the United States Kingdom in November 2014.

Battle of Gods was the first film considered an official part of Dragon Ball history, and it was set during the time jump in chapter 517 of the original manga, with original creator Akira Toriyama deeply involved. The plot involves Beerus, the God of Destruction, who learns of the defeat of the galactic overlord Frieza at the hands of Goku. In search of an opponent worthy of his power, Beerus, along with his partner Whis, travels to the North Galaxy to challenge Goku to battle.

Battle of Gods would later be adapted to the first Dragon Ball Super story arc, which expanded upon the film’s plot.

19. Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection ‘F’

Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection ‘F’ (Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル Z 復活 の 「F エ フ」, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru Zetto: Fukkatsu no ‘Efu’) is a Japanese fantasy martial arts film by Animated Science 2015, the 19th film based on the Dragon Ball, and the 15th to carry the Dragon Ball Z brand, opened in theaters on April 18. It is the first Japanese film to be screened in IMAX 3D and received screenings in 4DX theaters.

Resurrection ‘F’ is the second film in the franchise personally overseen by series creator Akira Toriyama and serves as a direct sequel to 2013’s Battle of Gods. As such, Resurrection ‘F was officially considered part of Dragon Ball canon. The plot of the film describes the return of the villain Freeza, who after his resurrection through the Dragon Balls of the same name, goes into extensive training in order to take revenge on the Saiyans.

The film received a worldwide release, both in Japan and through international dubbed versions. Funimation’s English dub of the film received a limited release in North American theaters between August 4 and August 13, 2015. Madman Entertainment released the film in Australian theaters on August 6, where it ran until August 19. August 2015. Manga Entertainment acquired the rights for the UK premiere in September 2015. The film received generally favorable reviews, with critics praising the quality of the animation and fast-paced action sequences while criticizing the plot. .

The movie was later adapted into the second story arc of Dragon Ball Super, with the addition of additional scenes, subplots before its events.

20. Dragon Ball Super: Broly

Dragon Ball Super: Broly (Japanese: ド ラ ゴ ン ボ ー ル 超 ス ー パ ー ブ ロ リ ー, Hepburn: Doragon Bōru Sūpā: Burorī) is a 2018 Japanese anime martial arts adventure / fantasy film, Directed by Tatsuya Nagamine and written by the creator of the Dragon Ball series Akira Toriyama. It is the 20th Dragon Ball feature film overall, the third film produced with Toriyama’s direct involvement, and the first to carry the Dragon Ball Super brand.

Set after the events of Universe Survival Saga depicted in Dragon Ball Super, the film follows series protagonists Goku and Vegeta as they encounter a powerful Saiyan named Broly. At first, it tells the story of the Saiyans and the backstory of these three Saiyans with different fates connected with their race’s turbulent period, and then it results in a massive fight between them.

The film represents the first appearance of a reworked iteration of Broly in the main Dragon Ball continuity, following the character’s non-canon appearances in the films Broly – The Legendary Super Saiyan (1993), Broly – Second Coming (1994), and Bio- Broly (1994). Dragon Ball Super: Broly became the highest-grossing Dragon Ball movie of all time, the highest-grossing anime movie of 2018, and one of the highest-grossing anime movies of all time. A second Dragon Ball Super movie is in development, although it currently has no release date.

Source – Dragon Ball (Wikipedia)

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Karandeep Singh
Love to read manga and webtoon. Solo leveling is my favorite webtoon and Black Clover is favorite manga.

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